Professor Jim Nelson – Predicting Disasters Using Global Water Intelligence

Professor Jim Nelson – Predicting Disasters Using Global Water Intelligence

Accurate knowledge of the water cycle is essential for predicting disasters such as floods and droughts. However, it’s not easy to obtain good information from traditional weather and water forecasts. The Group on Earth Observations Global Water Sustainability initiative (GEOGloWS) provides hydrologic forecasts through an accessible web service to assist local water users. Partnering with water scientists worldwide, Professor Jim Nelson of Brigham Young University worked with the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts to develop a global streamflow service. This service provides local communities with actionable water intelligence, enabling them to focus on solutions to water-related problems.

Dr Natalia Sira – A Holistic Approach to Health Necessitates a Deeper Understanding of Human Development

Dr Natalia Sira – A Holistic Approach to Health Necessitates a Deeper Understanding of Human Development

Connecting body and mind through the consideration of both the physical and psychological components of health helps determine our reactions and developmental behaviour. Furthermore, the ways in which we achieve our optimal developmental potential manage how well we can adapt and cope with changes in our environment, deal with stresses in life and maintain overall well-being. Dr Natalia Sira from East Carolina University is improving patient care by taking a holistic and individualised approach to health outcomes, treatment and rehabilitation, focusing on the role of family relationships, developmental needs and spirituality as important components of coping mechanisms.

Dr T. Colin Campbell – Determining the Link Between Diet and Cancer

Dr T. Colin Campbell – Determining the Link Between Diet and Cancer

Cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide and understanding the development of the disease is essential for prevention and treatment. Dr T. Colin Campbell from Cornell University’s Division of Nutritional Sciences proposes the intriguing theory that cancer is not primarily a genetic disease but a nutrition-responsive disease. By conducting numerous animal and human studies, he is providing convincing evidence on the importance of diet, particularly the consumption of animal-based protein, in the development of cancer.

Rydberg Atoms: Giants of the Atomic World

Rydberg Atoms: Giants of the Atomic World

The creation of giant atoms whose size is comparable to that of a grain of sand might sound like the stuff of science fiction, but in fact such species exist in nature and can now be created in the laboratory using advanced laser systems. Such exotic atoms, in which one electron is placed in a highly-energetic state, are termed Rydberg atoms, after the Swedish spectroscopist J. R. Rydberg who first characterised their properties. As might be expected, such extreme atoms possess very unusual physical and chemical properties. Their study has provided many new insights into the properties of Rydberg atoms themselves, their interactions with other atoms and molecules, and phenomena that arise from their collective interactions. The extreme properties of Rydberg atoms now enable emerging technological applications in sensing and quantum computation.

Advancing Quantum Computing to Accelerate Scientific Research

Advancing Quantum Computing to Accelerate Scientific Research

Over the past few years, the capabilities of quantum computers have reached the stage where they can be used to pursue research with widespread technological impact. Through their research, the Q4Q team at the University of Southern California, University of North Texas, and Central Michigan University, explores how software and algorithms designed for the latest quantum computing technologies can be adapted to suit the needs of applied sciences. In a collaborative project, the Q4Q team sets out a roadmap for bringing accessible, user-friendly quantum computing into fields ranging from materials science, to pharmaceutical drug development.

Scientia Issue #136

Scientia Issue #136

In this critical issue of Scientia, we showcase the work of scientists confronting the global challenge of cancer. Read the latest research on causes, risk factors, diagnosis and treatment that is revolutionising patient care.

Scientia Issue #135

Scientia Issue #135

Building a robust STEM community is dependent upon innovative and inclusive education, from primary school to university and beyond. Therefore, this issue showcases an inspiring collection of projects, each seeking to enhance STEM education worldwide.

Scientia Issue #134

Scientia Issue #134

While the world’s attention is focused on eradicating COVID-19, we must not forget that unsustainable farming practices and the ensuing biodiversity declines were leading factors in the emergence of this devastating disease. To prevent future pandemics, we must now find new ways to feed the human population while also protecting and restoring Earth’s biodiversity. Such sustainable agricultural methods have a range of other positive impacts, including climate change mitigation, improved animal welfare, and reduced social inequality.

Advancing Quantum Computing to Accelerate Scientific Research

Advancing Quantum Computing to Accelerate Scientific Research

Over the past few years, the capabilities of quantum computers have reached the stage where they can be used to pursue research with widespread technological impact. Through their research, the Q4Q team at the University of Southern California, University of North Texas, and Central Michigan University, explores how software and algorithms designed for the latest quantum computing technologies can be adapted to suit the needs of applied sciences. In a collaborative project, the Q4Q team sets out a roadmap for bringing accessible, user-friendly quantum computing into fields ranging from materials science, to pharmaceutical drug development.

Dr Susan Strahan | Dan Smale – Predicting the Health of the Ozone Layer to Ensure its Protection

Dr Susan Strahan | Dan Smale – Predicting the Health of the Ozone Layer to Ensure its Protection

The phasing out of ozone-depleting gases has set the ozone layer on the road to recovery. However, atmospheric changes wrought by rising greenhouse gas levels may represent a new threat to Earth’s protective shield. Dr Susan Strahan from the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and Dan Smale from the National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research (NIWA) in New Zealand combine atmospheric measurements with simulations to track and explain recent changes to the ozone layer, towards ensuring its protection into the future.

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SciComm Corner – Feeding the world with veganism, spreading the word with SciComm

SciComm Corner – Feeding the world with veganism, spreading the word with SciComm

The world’s population is on the rise, and has been for some time. In 1800 there were one billion people on the planet and today there are 7.9 billion. And, according to a global population forecast by the United Nations, this figure will reach around 10.9 billion by 2100. As the population grows, so too does demand for food. The United Nations Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO) has projected that food and feed production will need to expand by 70% by 2050 to meet these needs. Can this be done?

Accurate #watercycle forecasts are crucial for mitigating the impacts of #floods & #droughts. The #GEOGloWS project provides #water forecasts through a free web service, allowing decision makers in developing countries to protect lives & #agricuture:
https://www.scientia.global/professor-jim-nelson-predicting-disasters-using-global-water-intelligence/
@BYU

#ClimateChange & #COVID19 threaten future #FoodSecurity. #NASA's @HarvestProgram monitors #agriculture from space, to warn #farmers of likely #crop failures before they occur. This allows farmers & governments to prevent #food shortages:

https://www.scientia.global/dr-michael-humber-nasa-harvest-monitoring-food-security-from-space-during-the-covid-19-pandemic/
@umdgeography

By adapting #software designed for #QuantumComputers, the Q4Q team aims to bring accessible, user-friendly #QuantumComputing to #scientists in #MaterialsScience, #chemistry, #biology & #DrugDevelopment. Read more:

https://www.scientia.global/advancing-quantum-computing-to-accelerate-scientific-research/
#SciComm #science @doescience @qcb_usc

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