Connecting Science and Society

Latest Articles

Dr Jennifer Kay | Professor Bevin Page Engelward – The MIT Superfund Research Program: Studies on Cleaning Up Genes and the Environment

Dr Jennifer Kay | Professor Bevin Page Engelward – The MIT Superfund Research Program: Studies on Cleaning Up Genes and the Environment

In the United States, there are thousands of industrial sites contaminated by the irresponsible disposal of chemical waste. The higher than expected frequency of cancer cases near these sites has caused alarm, since many of the chemical contaminants found at these sites have been linked to the development of long-term health problems, including cancer. As leaders of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Superfund Research Program, Dr Jennifer Kay (Research Scientist and Research Translation Director) and Professor Bevin Page Engelward (Program Director) are using their expertise to investigate the genetic factors that influence susceptibility to adverse health outcomes following exposure to environmental chemicals.

Professor Steven E. Wilson – Clearing the Haze: Understanding the Process of Scarring Following Corneal Injury

Professor Steven E. Wilson – Clearing the Haze: Understanding the Process of Scarring Following Corneal Injury

Any injury such as trauma, surgery or infection to the cornea in the eye may result in persistent scarring (clinically referred to as fibrosis) due to the wound healing response. Professor Steven E. Wilson at the Cole Eye Institute of the Cleveland Clinic Foundation has identified that defective epithelial basement membrane (EBM) regeneration plays a central role in the development of scar producing myofibroblast cells. Critically, Professor Wilson suggests that the pathophysiological consequences of defective EBM regeneration are also likely to have wider relevance to the fibrosis that occurs in other organs, such as the lungs, heart, kidneys, and skin.

Professor Kirk Erickson – Health Neuroscience: How and Why Exercise Improves Cognitive

Professor Kirk Erickson – Health Neuroscience: How and Why Exercise Improves Cognitive

We all know exercise is good for us. In addition to the renowned physical benefits, Professor Kirk Erickson in the Department of Psychology at the University of Pittsburgh is providing powerful evidence that exercise may improve cognitive faculties throughout the lifespan. Read on to discover the wide range of ways in which exercise can help us to live our lives to the fullest across the years, and how the emerging field of health neuroscience may inform public health policy for our better good.

Dr Jun Hua – Innovations in Functional Brain Imaging to Improve Neurosurgery

Dr Jun Hua – Innovations in Functional Brain Imaging to Improve Neurosurgery

Dr Jun Hua, Associate Professor at the F. M. Kirby Research Center for Functional Brain Imaging at the Kennedy Krieger Institute and Johns Hopkins University, USA, leads a team focused on developing novel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technologies for imaging the structure and function of the brain. Recently, they have been pioneering the development of new MRI techniques that can be used to improve pre-surgical planning for neurological patients and optimise patient outcomes.

Professor Stephan Pleschka | Professor M Lienhard Schmitz – The Influenza A Genotype and Cell Signalling Networks

Professor Stephan Pleschka | Professor M Lienhard Schmitz – The Influenza A Genotype and Cell Signalling Networks

Influenza viruses pose a major threat despite advances in vaccine and drug development. Research into the cellular and molecular mechanisms that drive influenza viruses aims to reveal new drug targets to fight disease. However, information on the molecular mechanisms of how influenza viruses infect and replicate in host cells is currently limited. As part of the German Collaborative Research Centre 1021 (CRC1021), Professors Stephan Pleschka and M Lienhard Schmitz at the Justus Liebig University Giessen in Germany are exploring the impact of the genetic variability of influenza viruses on the interactions between the virus and host cell that regulate viral infection and replication.

Dr James G. Thomson – Lilac Limes: More Than Just A Pretty Fruit

Dr James G. Thomson – Lilac Limes: More Than Just A Pretty Fruit

Genetic technologies are becoming increasingly sophisticated, with scientists now able to precisely insert beneficial genes into plant genomes and accurately predict the activity of the new genes in the host plant. However, public acceptance has not kept up with the technological advancements in this field. Dr James G. Thomson and his team at the USDA’s Western Regional Research Center have developed Lilac Limes using this advanced genetic technology. This striking purple fruit could help to open dialogue with consumers and encourage greater acceptance of the use of genetic technology in food plants.

Latest Publications

Scientia Issue #129

Scientia Issue #129

  ACHIEVING AGRICULTURAL SUSTAINABILITY THROUGH INNOVATION   This critical issue of Scientia celebrates scientists who tackle one of the greatest challenges of our time: ensuring global food security and agricultural sustainability into the future....

Scientia Issue #128

Scientia Issue #128

IMPROVING HEALTH ACROSS THE GLOBE: INNOVATIONS FOR A NEW DECADE We open 2020 and this critical issue of Scientia by celebrating a diverse range of scientific breakthroughs and achievements that are driving forward health and well-being worldwide. In this new...

Scientia Issue #127

Scientia Issue #127

  STRENGTHENING THE STEM COMMUNITY THROUGH INCLUSIVE EDUCATION   In this critical issue of Scientia, we showcase an inspiring array of projects, each seeking to enhance science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education worldwide....

Editor’s Pick

Professor Kirk Erickson – Health Neuroscience: How and Why Exercise Improves Cognitive

Professor Kirk Erickson – Health Neuroscience: How and Why Exercise Improves Cognitive

We all know exercise is good for us. In addition to the renowned physical benefits, Professor Kirk Erickson in the Department of Psychology at the University of Pittsburgh is providing powerful evidence that exercise may improve cognitive faculties throughout the lifespan. Read on to discover the wide range of ways in which exercise can help us to live our lives to the fullest across the years, and how the emerging field of health neuroscience may inform public health policy for our better good.

Building the STEM Students We Need

Building the STEM Students We Need

Despite recent efforts to promote diversity in STEM education and professional environments, some ethnic groups remain highly underrepresented in STEM fields, including the Hispanic/LatinX community. To tackle this underrepresentation, researchers at the University of San Diego have created a multi-dimensional program funded by the National Science Foundation called STEMWoW, which is designed to promote and sustain interest in STEM disciplines among middle school students from underserved communities.

Subscribe

Subscribe now!


Blog

Merits of getting help with your public sci-comm

Merits of getting help with your public sci-comm

Most universities and companies have a media department to take care of related matters, and they can do a good job. The problem with the latter is, the skill set required for public sci-comm is a little different and it is often better carried out by someone with experience in the area. Furthermore, if a representative does all of your public sci-comm, no one will get to know you, or your science, on an intimate level.

Twitter

#Researchers @MIT_SRP are investigating how #genetics influence #disease onset after exposure to #chemicalwaste. Read more: https://t.co/fU54QKtItV #scicomm #outreach

#Researchers @ClevelandClinic are progressing understanding of #cornea #scarring with wider implications for how #fibrosis occurs in other #body #organs. Read more: https://t.co/yxoOsG9mIe #scicomm #outreach

Load More...

BARRIER FREE POLICY

No pay walls. No subscription walls. No language barrier. Simple instant public access to science – opening a dialogue between science and society.

CREATIVE COMMONS

We publish under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 (CC BY-NC 4.0)

DECLARATION ON RESEARCH ASSESSMENT (DORA)

We support and encourage the DORA initiative

OPEN ACCESS POLICY

Scientia adheres to the open access policy. Open Access (OA) stands for unrestricted access and unrestricted reuse.

DOI

Scientia is officially registered with CrossRef making our research content easy to find, cite, link, and assess.