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Professor David Magnuson – Spinal Cord Injury and Recovery in Rats: Informing Human Rehabilitation

Professor David Magnuson – Spinal Cord Injury and Recovery in Rats: Informing Human Rehabilitation

Professor David Magnuson, at the University of Louisville, Kentucky, describes himself as ‘a CPG guy’ and occasionally, more informally as ‘a rat guy!’ His work on the function of the central pattern generator (CPG) in the rat spinal cord following spinal cord injury, has produced both surprising and thought-provoking results. This research may ultimately challenge the established clinical beliefs and practices around the ways to best rehabilitate human patients with severe spinal cord injury.

Professor Kim Dale | Dr Hedda Meijer – The Role of Notch Signalling within the Molecular Clock in the Early Development of the Skeleton

Professor Kim Dale | Dr Hedda Meijer – The Role of Notch Signalling within the Molecular Clock in the Early Development of the Skeleton

Cells possess the ability to interact with one another through complex signalling pathways. Different signals regulate how cells differentiate, undergoing modifications that ultimately allow them to adopt different cell fates and perform specific functions. The laboratory of Professor Kim Dale from the University of Dundee, Scotland, has made seminal contributions to our understanding of how the Notch signalling pathway controls the formation of tissues and organs in the earliest stages of development. Their important research has unveiled new insights into the molecular basis of Notch signalling in the context of normal development which will further our understanding of the molecular basis of developmental disorders and a multitude of diseases correlated with aberrant Notch signalling.

Dr Scott Gerber – A Novel Combination Therapy for Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma

Dr Scott Gerber – A Novel Combination Therapy for Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma

Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) is an aggressive type of cancer. It is relatively common and is one of the leading causes of cancer mortality. Unfortunately, it is often detected only in the late stage of the disease and fails to respond to pre-surgical approaches, such as chemotherapy or radiotherapy, that are needed to shrink the tumour mass before surgical removal. Dr Scott Gerber at the University of Rochester Medical Center, USA, is working with colleagues to develop a novel combined therapy to overcome this issue and increase the survival of PDA patients.

Dr Elizabeth A. Cooper – New Sorghum Reference Genome Highlights Genetics Underlying Sweet Varieties

Dr Elizabeth A. Cooper – New Sorghum Reference Genome Highlights Genetics Underlying Sweet Varieties

Sorghum is a staple crop in many regions of the world. As such, this versatile plant has been selectively bred into a number of cultivars, including sweet varieties predominantly used for forage, silage, sweet syrup and bioenergy production. Dr Elizabeth A. Cooper and her team at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte generated a full reference genome for the sweet sorghum cultivar ‘Rio’ with the aim of understanding the genetics underlying the differences between grain and sweet cultivars. Their research could provide a vital tool for biologists and breeders to improve sweet sorghum lineages.

Professor Gordon Carmichael – Unravelling the Biology of snoRNAs Implicated in Prader-Willi Syndrome

Professor Gordon Carmichael – Unravelling the Biology of snoRNAs Implicated in Prader-Willi Syndrome

Prader-Willi Syndrome is a rare genetic neurodevelopmental disorder that gives rise to a vast array of symptoms which affect the individual from birth. There is currently no cure for Prader-Willi Syndrome. Professor Gordon Carmichael and his team from the Department of Genetics and Genome Sciences at the University of Connecticut Health Centre, USA, believe it is crucial to understand the affected chromosome 15 region to unravel the pathogenesis of Prader-Willi Syndrome and his team are making significant strides towards achieving this goal.

Professor Michael O’Donnell – A Twin DNA Replication Factory

Professor Michael O’Donnell – A Twin DNA Replication Factory

For life on Earth to grow, its genetic material must be copied and reproduced in a process known as DNA replication. Professor Michael O’Donnell, head of the Rockefeller University’s DNA replication laboratory, has devoted his over 30-year career to the study of the protein complex that is responsible for just that – the replisome. Recently, Professor O’Donnell and his team uncovered exciting insights into the function of this remarkable piece of molecular machinery.

Latest Publications

Scientia Issue #131

Scientia Issue #131

  BUILDING BRIGHTER FUTURES THROUGH INNOVATION IN PSYCHOLOGY AND NEUROSCIENCE   This important and timely issue of Scientia showcases the scientists striving to build brighter futures for humankind through their pioneering endeavours across...

Scientia Issue #130

Scientia Issue #130

  NEW HORIZONS IN EARTH SCIENCE AND ASTRONOMY   In these challenging and uncertain times, it is with great pleasure that I introduce this captivating edition of Scientia, which showcases a diverse collection of research, on topics ranging from climate change...

Scientia Issue #129

Scientia Issue #129

  ACHIEVING AGRICULTURAL SUSTAINABILITY THROUGH INNOVATION   This critical issue of Scientia celebrates scientists who tackle one of the greatest challenges of our time: ensuring global food security and agricultural sustainability into the future....

Latest Videos

Editor’s Pick

Dr Malcolm Doupe | Dr Frode F. Jacobsen – Ending the Revolving Door of Emergency Department Visits for Older Adults

Dr Malcolm Doupe | Dr Frode F. Jacobsen – Ending the Revolving Door of Emergency Department Visits for Older Adults

‘Health is merely the slowest possible rate at which one can die’ (Anonymous). Old age faces us all (if we are fortunate), but while we are generally living longer, we are not necessarily living that extended time being healthy. Older adults are now the fastest-growing segment of the population worldwide, and internationally, healthcare systems are scrambling to cope with the new demands this will bring. Here, we review the work of long-time research collaborators Dr Malcolm Doupe (University of Manitoba) and Dr Frode F. Jacobsen (Western Norway University of Applied Sciences) to address these fundamental issues.

Professor Carl Borrebaeck | Dr Ulrika Axelsson – Finding the Molecular Fingerprint of Psychological Resilience in Breast Cancer Patients

Professor Carl Borrebaeck | Dr Ulrika Axelsson – Finding the Molecular Fingerprint of Psychological Resilience in Breast Cancer Patients

Professor Carl Borrebaeck and Dr Ulrika Axelsson are Director and Deputy Director, respectively, of the CREATE Health Translational Cancer Centre, Lund University, Sweden; a venue with an outstanding record of world-class cancer research. They are leading research into the fascinating topic of whether cancer patients’ psychological resilience after their cancer diagnosis may be linked to biomolecular processes, suggesting a mind-body link between the ability to cope psychologically and its impact on cancer prognosis.

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SciComm Corner

SciComm Corner – Why space exploration needs science communication

SciComm Corner – Why space exploration needs science communication

Science communication has taken significant strides outside the official efforts of space missions themselves. Through access to press releases and online journals, and the ability to easily interact with researchers, journalists from a wide range of publications are now able to engage a large sector of the public through a diverse range of different ways, including the in-depth articles you can read in Scientia.

Twitter

#Researchers @uofl are challenging the established #clinical beliefs and practices around the ways to best #rehabilitate human #patients with severe #spinalcordinjury. Their #research has important #clinical implications - Read more here: https://www.scientia.global/professor-david-magnuson-spinal-cord-injury-and-recovery-in-rats-informing-human-rehabilitation/ #paralysis

#Researchers @urochestermed are developing a novel combined #therapy for #PancreaticCancer. #Preclinical work shows great promise in overcoming this extremely difficult to treat cause of #mortality. Read more: https://www.scientia.global/dr-scott-gerber-a-novel-combination-therapy-for-pancreatic-ductal-adenocarcinoma/?doing_wp_cron=1600451249.1898779869079589843750 #cancer #disease #pancreas #scicomm

#Researchers @KimDale_lab @dundeeuni are pioneering understanding of how the #Notch signalling pathway controls the formation of ##tissues and #organs in the earliest stages of #development. Read more: https://www.scientia.global/professor-kim-dale-dr-hedda-meijer-the-role-of-notch-signalling-within-the-molecular-clock-in-the-early-development-of-the-skeleton/ #developmentaldisorders #stemcells

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