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Andrew LaTour – Creating a Circular Economy for Sustainable Metal Manufacturing

Andrew LaTour – Creating a Circular Economy for Sustainable Metal Manufacturing

Facilities for recycling metal parts at the locations they are required would be a major milestone in the global struggle towards sustainable industry. Yet for all its advantages, the innovations required to realise such a goal are a daunting prospect. Now, Andrew LaTour and his colleagues at MolyWorks Materials are bringing the idea one step closer to reality, through the development of their ‘Mobile Foundry’. The company’s work could soon provide a new basis for developing a completely closed-loop economy in areas related to metal manufacturing, potentially slashing the industry’s negative environmental impacts.

Dr Mark Boyce – Adapting Grassland Grazing to Boost Carbon Sequestration

Dr Mark Boyce – Adapting Grassland Grazing to Boost Carbon Sequestration

Globally, grassland ecosystems represent a vast, often under-appreciated store of carbon. Sustainable grazing practices offer the potential for maximising the role of these ecosystems as carbon storehouses and biodiversity safeguards. Dr Mark Boyce and his team from the University of Alberta have been investigating how cattle-grazed systems can be adapted to increase carbon storage on the Canadian Prairies. They use the data collected to create protocols for supporting the inclusion of grazing strategies in climate mitigation plans.

Professor Leila Farhadi – Remote Sensing & Computer Modelling: Understanding the Dynamic Water Cycle

Professor Leila Farhadi – Remote Sensing & Computer Modelling: Understanding the Dynamic Water Cycle

The Earth’s water cycle is an incredibly complex system, and is closely coupled to the planet’s energy and carbon cycles. One of the biggest challenges for hydrologists is to accurately model the components of this system and begin to understand how human-induced changes to the climate and landscape will affect it. Combining computer modelling with observational data, Professor Leila Farhadi and her team at the George Washington University created a novel approach to mapping two critical components of the water cycle: evapotranspiration from the landscape and recharge to aquifers. Their work has implications for predicting and responding to water shortages, towards ensuring global water and food security.

Dr Nathalie Pettorelli – Rewilding: Bet on Nature

Dr Nathalie Pettorelli – Rewilding: Bet on Nature

If there is one thing to celebrate about this year, it’s the fact that the country has finally started to wake up to the climate emergency. Thanks, among other things, to the thousands of children regularly striking for their right to have a better future than the one we have been building for them, a majority of the UK public, now back a 2030 zero-carbon target.

Dr Sigrid Netherer – A Robust New Framework for Bark Beetle Management

Dr Sigrid Netherer – A Robust New Framework for Bark Beetle Management

The economically important Norway spruce tree naturally grows in mountain forest ecosystems, and is the main tree species in vast plantations across Europe. However, in the recent decades, its risk of attack by the destructive Eurasian spruce bark beetle has considerably increased. Although the complex interactions of host, pest and environmental conditions that allow attacks to occur have been extensively studied for more than 100 years, predictive tools for pest management still suffer from knowledge gaps. Dr Sigrid Netherer and her team at the University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences (BOKU), Austria, have been investigating the role of drought stress and other environmental and biotic factors on infestations, to produce a novel universal framework for monitoring and predicting bark beetle outbreaks.

Professor Yoshio Waseda – Understanding the Atomic Structure of New Materials

Professor Yoshio Waseda – Understanding the Atomic Structure of New Materials

Materials science – the discovery and characterisation of new materials – drives forward the creation of new technology. In particular, the development of thin films of materials is vital to the electronics industry, as they are used in various device components such as displays and sensors. The properties of these materials are defined by their atomic structure, and until recently it was a major challenge for scientists to accurately characterise this. Towards this aim, Professor Yoshio Waseda and his team at the Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials have developed a novel method for characterising the atomic structure of thin films.

Latest Publications

Scientia Issue #127

Scientia Issue #127

  STRENGTHENING THE STEM COMMUNITY THROUGH INCLUSIVE EDUCATION   In this critical issue of Scientia, we showcase an inspiring array of projects, each seeking to enhance science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education worldwide....

Scientia Issue #126

Scientia Issue #126

  SHAPING A BETTER WORLD THROUGH SOCIAL SCIENCE AND HUMANITIES RESEARCH   In this captivating edition of Scientia, we showcase a diverse selection of research achievements across the humanities and social sciences, from history to linguistics, and...

Scientia Issue #125

Scientia Issue #125

  CELEBRATING DISCOVERY AND INNOVATION IN GENETIC SCIENCE   This important issue of Scientia showcases the vital work of scientists in the field of genetics, the branch of biology concerned with the study of genes, genetic variation, and heredity....

Editor’s Pick

Dr Sigrid Netherer – A Robust New Framework for Bark Beetle Management

Dr Sigrid Netherer – A Robust New Framework for Bark Beetle Management

The economically important Norway spruce tree naturally grows in mountain forest ecosystems, and is the main tree species in vast plantations across Europe. However, in the recent decades, its risk of attack by the destructive Eurasian spruce bark beetle has considerably increased. Although the complex interactions of host, pest and environmental conditions that allow attacks to occur have been extensively studied for more than 100 years, predictive tools for pest management still suffer from knowledge gaps. Dr Sigrid Netherer and her team at the University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences (BOKU), Austria, have been investigating the role of drought stress and other environmental and biotic factors on infestations, to produce a novel universal framework for monitoring and predicting bark beetle outbreaks.

Dr Tammy Movsas, MD, MPH – Towards a Brighter Future: How Zietchick Research Institute Plans to Transform Treatment for Retinal Disease

Dr Tammy Movsas, MD, MPH – Towards a Brighter Future: How Zietchick Research Institute Plans to Transform Treatment for Retinal Disease

Both diabetic adults and premature babies are at risk for a similar type of eye disease that involves the growth of abnormal, blood vessels in the retina, the photosensitive layer of the eye. When this eye disease occurs in diabetics, it is called diabetic retinopathy and when it occurs in premature infants, it is called retinopathy of prematurity. The pathologic vessels, seen in both of these diseases, can pull on the retina and cause it to detach, leading to blindness. Dr Tammy Movsas (Executive Director and Principal Investigator) and Dr Arivalagan Muthusamy (Chief Scientist) at the Zietchick Research Institute, USA, are developing new therapeutics to treat these serious retinal diseases that affect both premature baby eyes and mature adult eyes, such as those of diabetic women.

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Blog

Merits of getting help with your public sci-comm

Merits of getting help with your public sci-comm

Most universities and companies have a media department to take care of related matters, and they can do a good job. The problem with the latter is, the skill set required for public sci-comm is a little different and it is often better carried out by someone with experience in the area. Furthermore, if a representative does all of your public sci-comm, no one will get to know you, or your science, on an intimate level.

Twitter

#Researchers @HHU_de are exploring how we #communicate #social and #emotional information without words. Read more here: https://t.co/4RvVrNj1Uq #anxiety #depression #aggression #olfaction #chemosensory #mentalhealth #memory @dfg_public

Read this article by Dr Nathalie @Pettorelli of @ZSLScience, in which she discusses how #rewilding is an effective solution for tackling both #climatebreakdown & the #biodiversity crisis: https://t.co/pMorpX61z7 @OfficialZSL #climatechange #ecologicalbreakdown #environment

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