Agricultural Science

Dr Victor E. Cabrera – Dairy Brain: A Step Towards Smarter Management in Dairy Farms

Dr Victor E. Cabrera – Dairy Brain: A Step Towards Smarter Management in Dairy Farms

To manage their farms effectively, dairy farmers must base their decisions on real-time and continuous data streams, which collect information about feeding, milking, and an array of other factors. Dairy Brain is a toolkit introduced by Dr Victor E. Cabrera and his colleagues at the University of Wisconsin – Madison, which integrates the data streams collected by different software onto a single platform, and applies the latest algorithms to reveal novel insights. The technology could soon enable farmers and industry professionals to make far better use of the latest techniques in data analysis – and may even lead to new advances in efficiency and sustainability.

Dr Mark Gleason – Intelligent Spraying: Improving Prospects for Sustainable Pesticide Use

Dr Mark Gleason – Intelligent Spraying: Improving Prospects for Sustainable Pesticide Use

Pesticides may be essential in ensuring abundant and healthy yields of many crops, but so far, the techniques used to spray them have led to considerable environmental damage. In his research, Dr Mark Gleason, a plant pathologist at Iowa State University, assesses the performance of new technologies that can deploy pesticides on apple trees in more efficient and less hazardous ways. These approaches enable farmers to minimise pesticide use without sacrificing crop yields. Through combining laser-based ‘LiDAR’ (light detection and ranging) technology with disease-warning systems to time sprays efficiently, his project team hopes to offer more sustainable and environmentally friendly options for apple growers.

Dr Lynn Brandenberger | Dr Joshua Massey – ‘Green Manure’: How Cover Crops Create Healthy Soils and Boost Crop Yields

Dr Lynn Brandenberger | Dr Joshua Massey – ‘Green Manure’: How Cover Crops Create Healthy Soils and Boost Crop Yields

In order to meet the demands of a growing human population, farmers across the globe are attempting to improve the yields and nutritional content of their crops. However, this is an especially difficult challenge, in an age where climate change is negatively impacting our agricultural systems. To address these pressing issues, Dr Lynn Brandenberger and Dr Joshua Massey of Oklahoma State University focus on the intersection of soil health and crop production. Recently, they demonstrated how cover crops can greatly improve soil health and, consequently, enhance crop yields.

Dr Marília Chiavegato – Integrating Sustainability with Productivity in Crop and Animal Farming

Dr Marília Chiavegato – Integrating Sustainability with Productivity in Crop and Animal Farming

The demand on agricultural systems to increase the food supply has risen sharply as the global population continues to grow. However, as agricultural systems increase productivity, they also emit more greenhouse gases and exacerbate climate change. Simultaneously meeting food supply demands and reducing environmental impact in agricultural settings is one of the most important issues of our time. Dr Marília Chiavegato of The Ohio State University has dedicated her career to studying the ecological components of agricultural ecosystems, called ‘agroecosystems’. Her team’s findings will aid the development of management practices that not only boost productivity, but also lower the environmental impact associated with conventional agriculture.

Dr Curtis R. Youngs – Improving Livestock Through Reproductive Technologies

Dr Curtis R. Youngs – Improving Livestock Through Reproductive Technologies

Reproductive biotechnologies have contributed to many major advances in livestock production, and the proper application of these technologies can lead to livestock with superior genetic traits. This is vitally important given the high rates of malnourishment and poverty in developing countries, where communities could greatly benefit from an increase in meat and dairy products. Collaborating with scientists across the world, Dr Curtis R. Youngs of Iowa State University aims to increase the production of animal-derived foods in developing nations by applying reproductive biotechnologies to improve the efficiency and sustainability of livestock production.

Protecting Palau’s Food Security and Marine Ecology Using Satellite Technology

Protecting Palau’s Food Security and Marine Ecology Using Satellite Technology

Palau, a remote group of islands in the Pacific Ocean, relies heavily on wild fish to feed its citizens and support its economy. With a growing population and thriving tourism industry, the country cannot afford a crash in catch size. However, climate change is altering the ecosystems of Palau’s fishing waters, threatening harvests of important fish species. To improve the country’s food security and accelerate the achievement of the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals, the Palauan Government has teamed up with the Nature Conservancy to build a sustainable aquaculture community on the islands, with support from NASA. Using NASA satellite observations, the collaboration helps aquaculture farmers to find optimum locations to farm fish and shellfish, allowing them to produce an abundance of seafood while protecting the surrounding marine environment.

Dr Kurt Gamperl – Exploring How Fish Adapt to Climate Change: Sustainable Aquaculture and Species Conservation

Dr Kurt Gamperl – Exploring How Fish Adapt to Climate Change: Sustainable Aquaculture and Species Conservation

With the global population increasing at a considerable rate, it is becoming vitally important to improve seafood production to meet the growing demand for healthy protein. As our current fishing practices are damaging to marine ecosystems, fish farming is seen as a sustainable alternative to producing seafood, but only if it is resilient to the effects of climate change. By researching how environmental change affects fish biology, Dr Kurt Gamperl of Memorial University of Newfoundland and Labrador and his colleagues aim to make fish farming more sustainable, while ensuring global food security and allowing wild fish populations to recover.

Dr Michael Humber – NASA Harvest: Monitoring Food Security from Space During the COVID-19 Pandemic

Dr Michael Humber – NASA Harvest: Monitoring Food Security from Space During the COVID-19 Pandemic

In the face of the combined challenges of climate change and COVID-19, reliable access to accurate information about crop health has never been more crucial. Dr Michael Humber at the University of Maryland is the Data Lead of the NASA Harvest project – a global collaboration of researchers from many different backgrounds, who are aiming to provide this data using advanced satellite-based technologies. His team’s work has already had an important impact on systems that warn farmers of likely crop failures before they occur, and could be vital for ensuring global food security in the coming decades.

Dr Mark Westhusin – A Bright Future for Transgenic Livestock

Dr Mark Westhusin – A Bright Future for Transgenic Livestock

Advancements in genetic technologies have made precise gene editing a reality. Used extensively to develop crops that exhibit higher yields and resistance to pests and diseases, genetic modification could also transform livestock production. Building on decades of animal cloning research, Dr Mark Westhusin from the Reproductive Sciences Laboratory at Texas A&M University is using genetic and reproductive technologies to improve livestock for food, medicine, and medical research.

Dr Peter Kevan | Charlotte Coates – Exploring Micrometeorology in Plant Stems and Flowers

Dr Peter Kevan | Charlotte Coates – Exploring Micrometeorology in Plant Stems and Flowers

As complex living organisms, plants can often display intricate interactions with the air inside and around them. So far, however, many characteristics of these processes have gone largely unexplored. In their research, Charlotte Coates and Dr Peter Kevan at the University of Guelph combine field surveys with advanced imaging technologies to study the ‘micrometeorology’ that takes place in and around the stems and flowers of many plants. Their discoveries are shedding new light on how these plants grow and reproduce, and how some species are providing ideal habitats for ecologically damaging insects.

Dr Sanju A. Sanjaya | Bagyalakshmi Muthan – Creating Power Foods with Gene Technology

Dr Sanju A. Sanjaya | Bagyalakshmi Muthan – Creating Power Foods with Gene Technology

At least 820 million people suffer from hunger and malnutrition globally and human population growth is likely to exacerbate this problem in the future. It is becoming increasingly important to develop sustainable and efficient methods to meet food demands. To address this global issue, Dr Sanju A. Sanjaya and Bagyalakshmi Muthan from West Virginia State University and their colleagues from Michigan State University have developed genetic technologies to improve the nutritional and energy content of crops. Their technology could increase production and improve profitability and sustainability across a range of important crop plants.

Dr John Walker – Herbivore Helpers: Using Livestock to Manage Rangelands

Dr John Walker – Herbivore Helpers: Using Livestock to Manage Rangelands

Domestic herbivores – such as cattle, sheep, and goats – are remarkably important to ecosystems. Their feeding behaviours aid the management of natural habitats by preventing any individual plant species dominating the landscape. Thus, understanding livestock dietary preferences is vital for informing land management decisions. Dr John Walker from the Texas A&M AgriLife Research and Extension Center has devoted his career to exploring livestock dietary preferences, and how they can be manipulated to benefit rangelands. His ‘Aggie Cedar Eater’ (ACE) goats are now helping to control invasive juniper shrubs across the Great Plains of the US.

Dr Dennis Busch | Dr Andrew Cartmill – Agricultural Research Today for a Better Future Tomorrow

Dr Dennis Busch | Dr Andrew Cartmill – Agricultural Research Today for a Better Future Tomorrow

How to support the expanding human population is one of the greatest societal challenges in the 21st century. To meet the demand for food, fuel and fibre, agricultural productivity will need to dramatically increase. However, to ensure long-term sustainability and resilience, increased productivity must not sacrifice the health of the surrounding ecosystems. Led by Dr Dennis Busch and Dr Andrew Cartmill, the University of Wisconsin-Platteville’s Agro-Ecosystem Research Program draws on the expertise of local and international collaborating scientists and farmers to develop alternative agricultural practices that support sustainable intensification for future food security.

Dr Kenneth Johnson – Fighting Fire Blight in Organic Orchards

Dr Kenneth Johnson – Fighting Fire Blight in Organic Orchards

The bacteria that causes fire blight in apple and pear trees is notoriously difficult to control without antibiotics. With new regulations in the US preventing antibiotic use in organic orchards after 2014, organic farmers faced an impossible choice – lose their organic certification or risk the death of their trees. Working against the clock, plant pathologist Dr Kenneth Johnson from Oregon State University accelerated his efforts to provide organic farmers with another option. With his team of researchers and outreach specialists, he developed and evaluated non-antibiotic management strategies for fire blight in organic apple and pear orchards.

Dr Marlyse Leng – Creating Nutritious Baby Food from Local and Affordable Produce

Dr Marlyse Leng – Creating Nutritious Baby Food from Local and Affordable Produce

Malnutrition, occurring as either a lack of food or not eating enough of the right types of food, is a significant concern in many African countries, particularly for children. To address this issue, Dr Marlyse Leng and her colleagues at the University of Douala in Cameroon have recently developed a nutritious weaning food for infants, made from an endangered yam species to increase its production and use. After processing the yam with other key nutrients into an optimised formulation, they explored the food’s nutrient availability and antioxidant activity in comparison to other products.

Building Community Resiliency through Horticultural Innovation

Building Community Resiliency through Horticultural Innovation

Food insecurity directly impacts a third of the world’s population and perpetuates a cycle of hunger and malnutrition that is inherited through generations. Previous relief efforts have largely been donor-focused, providing only temporary solutions. To break the cycle of food insecurity, poverty, and hunger, relief efforts must empower communities and facilitate real transformative changes. Professor James Simon of Rutgers University and colleagues have developed a transferable horticulture model that builds upon local ecosystem knowledge and cultural infrastructures while embedding science-driven, market-first, and value chain methodologies. Introduced into several countries in sub-Saharan Africa, the model includes agribusiness and technical skills training to strengthen the participation of farmers and local entrepreneurs, particularly women and youth, in profitable value chains. Using this novel approach, the Rutgers team and their African colleagues have successfully demonstrated how horticulture can contribute to a real reduction in poverty and malnutrition, while fostering job creation, pride and creativity.

Dr Hannah Gosnell – Regenerative Agriculture: Putting the Heart and Soul Back in Farming

Dr Hannah Gosnell – Regenerative Agriculture: Putting the Heart and Soul Back in Farming

Modern industrial agriculture has helped farmers meet rising food demands, but these practices are contributing to a range of environmental problems. Regenerative agriculture holds promising solutions that could help to restore and maintain healthy ecosystems and contribute to climate change mitigation, while keeping pace with food demands and enhancing farmers’ resilience to environmental stressors. Through her research, Dr Hannah Gosnell aims to understand what motivates cattle and sheep farmers – also known as ranchers – to adopt and sustain the use of regenerative practices and what challenges must be navigated. Her work is informing efforts that encourage farmers to transition to these methods.

Dr Ramu Govindasamy – Ethnic Foods in the Recipe for Farming Success

Dr Ramu Govindasamy – Ethnic Foods in the Recipe for Farming Success

Farmers in the East Coast of the US are struggling to compete against the larger farms of other regions. Coupled with rising production costs and increasingly difficult growing conditions, producing conventional commodity crops is no longer viable for these farms. Switching to speciality and niche ethnic crops could help these farmers break into a growing market, improve profitability and future viability – and help fulfil the needs of ethnic communities. Dr Ramu Govindasamy from Rutgers University uses a market-first approach to investigate and develop opportunities for farmers to transition to ethnic crop production.

Dr Zachary Senwo – Catalysing Agriculture with Enzymes

Dr Zachary Senwo – Catalysing Agriculture with Enzymes

Enzymes make life as we know it possible. These active proteins are vital in nutrient cycling, metabolism, and cell functioning. With their diverse range of functions and ubiquity, enzymes could offer techniques to support healthy agricultural ecosystems, and as such, improve sustainability and future food security. Understanding their activities is vital to the organic agriculture revolution. Dr Zachary Senwo and his team at Alabama Agricultural and Mechanical (A&M) University have contributed years of important research to uncover the potential of enzymes towards informing novel agricultural practices.

Dr David Mota-Sanchez – Knowledge is Power in the Fight Against Pesticide Resistance

Dr David Mota-Sanchez – Knowledge is Power in the Fight Against Pesticide Resistance

First recognised over a century ago, the resistance of insects and other arthropods to pesticides is a growing problem, with implications for crop production and human health on a global scale. Dr David Mota-Sanchez and his team at Michigan State University are creating a worldwide, online database of resistance cases to catalogue the scale of the problem. Their work will aid decision makers in developing sustainable strategies to manage arthropod pests.

Dr Zachary Senwo – Microbes: Agriculture’s Microscopic Helpers

Dr Zachary Senwo – Microbes: Agriculture’s Microscopic Helpers

Climate change and environmental degradation are increasingly threatening our ability to feed a burgeoning human population. Switching to agricultural practices that support beneficial soil microbes, and thus healthy soils, may help farmers achieve the yields required for continued food security. Dr Zachary Senwo from the College of Agriculture, Life and Natural Sciences at Alabama A&M University has spent over two decades exploring how agricultural management practices impact soil health. In an extensive new project, his team is investigating soil nitrogen cycling and the role of microbes in soil health.

Dr Richard Goodman – Genetically Engineering Our Future Food Security

Dr Richard Goodman – Genetically Engineering Our Future Food Security

Genetically modified crops can offer a range of environmental and health benefits, such as reduced usage of chemical pesticides, improved farm efficiency and crop yields, and an enhanced nutritional profile. Despite this, fears surrounding genetic modification have led to a lack of acceptance of these foods by many consumers, regulators, and governmental organisations. Dr Richard Goodman from the Food Allergy Research and Resource Program at the University of Nebraska–Lincoln, is helping to shift the narrative around genetically modified crops, through his extensive work evaluating their safety.

Dr James Simon – A Breakthrough in the War Against Basil Downy Mildew

Dr James Simon – A Breakthrough in the War Against Basil Downy Mildew

Sweet basil is among the most popular and economically important culinary herbs, but by 2010, US production began to feel the impact of a newly emerging destructive disease: basil downy mildew. At that time, no sweet basil varieties were resistant to basil downy mildew and growers began relying heavily on fungicide application to avoid devastating crop losses. Dr James Simon at Rutgers University had been researching basil for 25 years and was eager to tackle this problem. Eight years later, Dr Simon’s team is proud to have successfully developed 12 new downy mildew resistant varieties of sweet basil and two varieties resistant to fusarium wilt disease.

Dr Thomas Gray – Cooperative Structures: Finding a Way Forward for Mid-size Farms

Dr Thomas Gray – Cooperative Structures: Finding a Way Forward for Mid-size Farms

More than 80% of agricultural land in the US is managed by farmers whose operations fall between small-scale farms with direct access to local markets, and larger industrialised farms. These farmers in the ‘middle’ increasingly struggle to find a place within the larger food production system. Through his work as part of the ‘Agriculture of the Middle’ Initiative, Dr Thomas Gray of the Rural Business-Cooperative Service at the US Department of Agriculture has been studying different types of cooperative structures for best adaptability to socio-economic and food consumption patterns for mid-size farm survival.

Dr Luis Tedeschi – Modelling a Sustainable Future for Livestock Production

Dr Luis Tedeschi – Modelling a Sustainable Future for Livestock Production

Intensive livestock farming has contributed to environmental degradation across the globe, and is also a major source of greenhouse gas emissions. However, meeting the protein demands of a growing global population requires further increases in the food supply. Dr Luis Tedeschi and his team from Texas A&M University and Texas A&M AgriLife Research have been studying the sustainable intensification of livestock production, utilising modelling-based approaches. They consider whether these tools can be used to increase production efficiency while minimising environmental impacts, helping to preserve and regenerate the natural resources that form the basis of the industry, for future generations.

Dr Bruno Basso – Improving Agricultural Sustainability with Digital Technology

Dr Bruno Basso – Improving Agricultural Sustainability with Digital Technology

In recent decades, advancements in agricultural practices have made the large-scale production of cheap and nutritious food possible. However, these practices are often damaging to the environment, making them unsustainable in the long term. Technology is now sufficiently developed that many of these environmental impacts can be reduced or mitigated, by using ‘big data’ to inform farming management decisions. Dr Bruno Basso from Michigan State University and his network of researchers have been exploring how digital technologies could usher in a new era of sustainable agriculture that balances competing economic and social interests while minimising trade-offs.

The British Society of Soil Science

The British Society of Soil Science

Founded in 1947, the British Society of Soil Science (BSSS) is an international membership organisation and charity dedicated to the study of soil in its widest aspects. Funded through subscriptions and income from its publications, BSSS is a platform for exchanging ideas and representing the views of soil scientists to decision-making bodies. The Society stimulates research by hosting conferences and publishing two scientific journals, and promotes education through a number of initiatives in schools, colleges and universities. In this exclusive interview, we speak with Professor Sacha Mooney, President of BSSS, who describes the great importance of soil science research, and the varied ways that the Society advances this diverse and fascinating field.

Dr Adelumola Oladeinde – Exploring Alternatives to Antibiotics for Reducing Salmonella in Poultry

Dr Adelumola Oladeinde – Exploring Alternatives to Antibiotics for Reducing Salmonella in Poultry

Salmonella remains the leading pathogen of food safety concern in the US, with poultry being the main vector. For many years, poultry producers have relied on antibiotics to curtail the prevalence of pathogens in their flocks. However, consumer concerns and the rise of antimicrobial resistance are leading to the withdrawal of antibiotics, leaving farmers in unchartered territory. Dr Adelumola Oladeinde at the US Department of Agriculture is collaborating with researchers from the University of Georgia and Colorado State University to develop novel techniques for reducing Salmonella in chickens. Their work focuses on preventing infection and predicting risk in antibiotic-free production.

Dr Charles DeLisi – Genetically Engineered Plants: A Potential Solution to Climate Change

Dr Charles DeLisi – Genetically Engineered Plants: A Potential Solution to Climate Change

Climate change is already having devastating effects felt across the globe. Without adequate measures to counteract the human drivers behind climate change, these negative consequences are guaranteed to increase in severity in the coming decades. Esteemed biomedical scientist, Dr Charles DeLisi of Boston University, urges that a multi-disciplinary approach to mitigating climate change is vital. Using predictive modelling, he has demonstrated the potential power of genetically engineering plants to remove excess carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, thereby mitigating climate change.

Dr Joel R. Coats – Natural Essential Oils as Novel Pesticides

Dr Joel R. Coats – Natural Essential Oils as Novel Pesticides

Insect pests cause devastating economic losses in agriculture, and as vectors of disease they have significant impact on the health of humans, livestock and pets. Plant essential oils have been used for centuries as protection against insect pests, but scientists have only recently begun to explore the extent of their potential for pest control. Dr Joel R. Coats and his team at Iowa State University’s Department of Entomology have been investigating essential oils as greener alternatives to conventional pesticides, and as a vital tool for overcoming pesticide resistance in insect populations.

Dr Lisa Dean – Investigating Functional Properties to Produce Even Better Peanuts

Dr Lisa Dean – Investigating Functional Properties to Produce Even Better Peanuts

Peanuts are a nutritious and sustainable food staple in many regions across the globe, as well as being enjoyed for their rich flavour. As such, the peanut industry is continually striving to improve peanut crops and the methods used to produce our favourite peanut-based foods. Dr Lisa Dean and her team at USDA-ARS have been investigating the flavours, nutritional compositions and physical properties of peanuts, with the aim of helping peanut growers and food manufacturers enhance the quality of the peanuts produced in the USA.

Dr Rakesh S. Chandran – Sustainable Weed Coexistence in Corn Crops

Dr Rakesh S. Chandran – Sustainable Weed Coexistence in Corn Crops

Agricultural weeds have the potential to cause significant crop loss. As such, conventional weed management practices have aimed to keep crop fields free from weeds through the broad application of herbicides. However, these practices have damaging consequences on the surrounding environment. Dr Rakesh Chandran and his team in the Agriculture and Natural Resources Department of West Virginia University have developed a more sustainable herbicide application regime that allows weeds to coexist with corn crops at acceptable levels, with the aim of improving environmental health without significantly sacrificing crop yield.